Medication Assisted Therapy: What You Need to Know

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, you may have heard of medication assisted therapy (MAT). MAT is a treatment option that combines medication with counseling and behavioral therapy to treat substance use disorders.

MAT can be an effective treatment option for some people, but it’s not right for everyone. It’s important to learn about all of your treatment options and to work with a treatment team that can help you make the best decision for your recovery.

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Introduction to Medication Assisted Therapy

Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) is the use of FDA-approved medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders.

MAT is used to treat a variety of Substance Use Disorders including: alcohol use disorder, opioid use disorder, and heroin use disorder.

MAT is not a replacement for traditional addiction treatments like counseling and behavioral therapies, but rather it is meant to be used in conjunction with these other treatment modalities.

There are several different types of medications that can be used in MAT, depending on the substance being treated.

Some common examples of FDA-approved medications used in MAT include: buprenorphine (Subutex, Suboxone), naltrexone (Vivitrol), and methadone (Dolophine).

MAT is effective in helping people to abstain from drug use, reduce their drug cravings, and avoid dangerous and potentially fatal overdoses.

If you or someone you know is struggling with a substance use disorder, please don’t hesitate to reach out for help. There are many resources available to you, including your local MAT program.

What is Medication Assisted Therapy?

Medication Assisted Therapy, also known as MAT, is a treatment method for substance abuse that combines the use of medication with counseling and behavioral therapy. This approach is designed to help people struggling with addiction reduce their dependence on drugs or alcohol and manage their recovery.

MAT can be an effective treatment option for people who have not been able to successfully quit using drugs or alcohol on their own. It can also be helpful for people who are struggling with withdrawal symptoms or who have relapsed after trying to quit on their own.

Medication Assisted Therapy is not a cure for addiction, but it can be a helpful tool in managing the disease. If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, talk to your doctor about whether MAT might be right for you.

The Benefits of Medication Assisted Therapy

Medication Assisted Therapy, or MAT, is a treatment option for those struggling with addiction. It is a holistic approach that combines medication with counseling and other support services.MAT has been shown to be an effective treatment for addiction, and can help people to avoid relapses, manage withdrawal symptoms, and recover from addiction. The use of medication in MAT can also help to reduce the risks associated with using other substances, such as alcohol or illicit drugs. If you are considering MAT as a treatment option for yourself or a loved one, it is important to understand the benefits of this approach.

Some of the benefits of Medication Assisted Therapy include:

1. reduces withdrawal symptoms and cravings;
2. helps people stay in treatment;
3. reduces the risk of relapse;
4. can be used in combination with other forms of treatment, such as counseling or support groups;
5. is an evidence-based treatment option that has been shown to be effective in treating addiction;
6. can help people to recover from addiction and live healthy and productive lives.

The Risks of Medication Assisted Therapy

Medication assisted therapy (MAT) is a treatment approach for addiction that combines the use of medication with counseling and behavioral therapies. MAT can be an effective treatment for substance use disorders, but it is not without risks. Some of the potential risks associated with MAT include:

-Dependence on the medication: People who receive MAT may become dependent on the medication used to treat their addiction. This means they may experience withdrawal symptoms if they stop taking the medication.

-Interactions with other substances: Medications used in MAT can interact with other substances, such as alcohol or other drugs. This can be dangerous and may lead to overdoses or other serious health problems.

-Side effects: Medications used in MAT can cause side effects, such as drowsiness, nausea, and vomiting. These side effects can make it difficult for people to stick with their treatment plans.

Who is a Candidate for Medication Assisted Therapy?

Not everyone with an opioid use disorder will require medication assisted therapy, but for many people, it can be an important and lifesaving part of treatment. There are a number of factors that may contribute to someone’s eligibility for MAT, including:

-The severity of their disorder
-The presence of other mental health disorders
-Their medical history
-Their social support system

For some people, MAT may not be appropriate due to contraindications with other medications they are taking or due to pregnancy. In some cases, people may not be able to take certain MAT medications because of allergies or sensitivities. Your doctor will be able to help you determine if MAT is right for you.

How Does Medication Assisted Therapy Work?

Medication assisted therapy (MAT) is a treatment approach that combines the use of medications with counseling and behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders. The goal of MAT is to help people reduce or stop their use of drugs and return to productive lives.

MAT programs use FDA-approved medications, such as methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone, to manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings. These medications are prescribed by a licensed provider and taken under their supervision. MAT medication doses are carefully monitored and adjusted based on each individual’s response, in order to ensure safety and effectiveness.

People in MAT also receive counseling and other behavioral therapies to address the underlying causes of their substance use disorder and help them develop healthy coping and life skills. MAT is provided by a team of counselors, doctors, nurses, and other trained professionals who work together to individualize treatment based on each patient’s needs.

MAT is an evidence-based approach that has been shown to be effective in treating substance use disorders. It can help people reduce or stop their drug use, improve their mental and physical health, regain employment, and rebuild relationships with family and friends.

What Medications are Used in Medication Assisted Therapy?

When it comes to addiction treatment, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Medication Assisted Therapy, or MAT, is an evidence-based approach that uses FDA-approved medications in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies to provide a “whole-patient” approach to treatment.

There are three main medications used in MAT:

• Methadone – Methadone is an opioid agonist that has been used for MAT since the 1960s. It is a long-acting medication that is administered daily in a clinic setting. Methadone works by binding to the same receptors in the brain as other opioids, but it does not produce the same “high” or euphoric effect. This reduces the cravings and withdrawal symptoms associated with addiction.

• Buprenorphine – Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist that was approved for MAT in 2002. It is a long-acting medication that can be administered daily or weekly. Buprenorphine works by binding to the same receptors in the brain as other opioids, but it produces a smaller “high” or euphoric effect. This reduces the cravings and withdrawal symptoms associated with addiction.

• Naltrexone – Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist that was approved for MAT in 1984. It is a long-acting medication that can be administered daily or weekly. Naltrexone works by blocking the receptors in the brain that are activated by opioids. This prevents the “high” or euphoric effect from other opioids, which reduces the cravings and withdrawal symptoms associated with addiction.

What are the Side Effects of Medication Assisted Therapy?

As with any medication, there are potential side effects associated with medication assisted therapy. These side effects may be mild and go away on their own, or they may be more severe and require medical intervention. Some of the most common side effects include:

-Drowsiness
-Nausea
-Vomiting
-Constipation
-Diarrhea
-Headache
-Dizziness
-Sweating
-Insomnia

How Long Does Medication Assisted Therapy Take?

The length of time that medication assisted therapy (MAT) takes can vary depending on the individual. Some people may only need MAT for a few weeks, while others may need it for months or even years. MAT is not a “one size fits all” treatment, so the timeline will be different for each person.

There are several factors that can affect how long someone needs to be in MAT. These include the severity of the addiction, how long the person has been using drugs, whether they have any other mental health disorders, and if they have a support system in place.

It is important to remember that MAT is not a quick fix. It is a process that takes time and effort. However, with dedication and commitment, it is possible to overcome addiction and live a drug-free life.

Is Medication Assisted Therapy Right for Me?

If you’re struggling with addiction, you may be wondering if medication assisted therapy (MAT) is right for you. MAT combines behavioral therapy with certain medications to treat substance use disorders. It can be an effective treatment for addiction, but it’s not right for everyone. Here’s what you need to know about MAT to help you decide if it’s the right treatment for you.

MAT is most effective when used in combination with behavioral therapy. The medications used in MAT can help to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms, making it easier to stick to your treatment plan. Behavioral therapy can help you to identify and change the behaviors that contribute to your addiction. Together, these two types of treatment can give you the tools you need to overcome addiction and achieve long-term sobriety.

MAT is not a cure for addiction, but it can be an effective treatment option. If you choose to participate in MAT, you will need to commit to taking your medication as prescribed and attending regular counseling sessions. Recovery from addiction is a lifelong process, but MAT can help you to achieve and maintain sobriety.

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