Rheumatology Medical Assistant Salary and Job Description

Rheumatology Medical assistants are in high demand. Learn about the salary, job description, and how to get started in this field.

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Rheumatology medical assistant Job description

Rheumatology medical assistants work with patients who have rheumatic diseases and disorders. They provide administrative and clinical support to rheumatologists, who are doctors who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

Rheumatology medical assistants typically have an associate’s degree in medical assisting or a related field. Some states require medical assistants to be certified by a professional organization, such as the American Association of Medical Assistants or the National Healthcare Association.

The duties of a rheumatology medical assistant include scheduling appointments, taking patient medical histories and vital signs, preparing patient charts, and assisting the doctor during examinations and procedures. They may also administer injections, collect laboratory specimens, and provide instruction to patients on how to take their medications correctly.

Rheumatology medical assistant: Salary

Rheumatology medical assistants are in charge of providing support to rheumatologists, who are physicians that specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and gout are just a few examples of conditions that fall under the rheumatologist’s umbrella. The medical assistant’s responsibilities include everything from greeting patients and scheduling appointments to drawing blood, performing diagnostic testing, and assisting with patient education.

The average salary for a rheumatology medical assistant is $36,000 per year. Rheumatology medical assistants with experience can earn up to $45,000 per year. Those who have experience working in a clinical setting may also be able to find jobs as rheumatology nurse practitioners or physician assistants.

Rheumatology medical assistant: Duties

The duties of a rheumatology medical assistant can vary depending on the size and type of doctor’s office or clinic where they work. In general, medical assistants in rheumatology practices provide administrative support and clinical care to patients with arthritis and other rheumatic diseases.

Rheumatology medical assistants may perform a variety of administrative tasks such as scheduling appointments, verifying insurance coverage, and handling billing and correspondence. They also maintain patient medical records prepare laboratory requisitions, and coordinate referrals to other health care providers. In some offices, they may assist the doctor with office procedures such as injections or joint aspirations.

Most rheumatology medical assistants have completed a postsecondary education program that includes courses in anatomy, physiology, Medical Terminology pharmacology, and clinical procedures. Many states have certified medical assistant programs that offer voluntary certification for graduates. Although certification is not required for employment, it may give graduates an advantage in the job market

Rheumatology medical assistant: Skills

The skills required for a rheumatology medical assistant are:
-The ability to work well under pressure and juggle multiple tasks simultaneously
– Knowledge of rheumatologic conditions and their treatment
-Excellent patient education skills
-Good communication skills
-Basic computer skills
Rheumatology medical assistants should also have:
-The ability to take initiative and be proactive
-A positive attitude
-Flexibility

Rheumatology medical assistant: Education

Rheumatology medical assistants need at least a high school diploma, though many have completed postsecondary education, such as a certificate or associate degree program in medical assisting. Certificate and degree programs typically last about one year and include both classroom and clinical instruction. These programs cover topics such as medical law and ethics, patient confidentiality, medical insurance billing and coding, office procedures, anatomy and physiology, and first aid.

Rheumatology medical assistant: Certification

Rheumatology medical assistants are health care professionals who work with patients suffering from arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. They may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, and private practices.

Medical assistants in this specialty area often have at least an Associate’s Degree in medical assisting or a related field. They must also be certified as a medical assistant by a nationally recognized organization, such as the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) or the National Healthcareer Association (NHA). Rheumatology medical assistants may also choose to pursue certification specifically in rheumatology through the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

Rheumatology medical assistants typically perform tasks such as taking patient histories, scheduling appointments, and handling insurance paperwork. They may also assist the physician with procedures such as injections and ultrasounds. In some cases, they may provide patient education on disease management and medication use.

Salaries for rheumatology medical assistants vary depending on experience, education, location, and employer. According to PayScale.com, the median salary for this occupation is $33,842 per year.

Rheumatology medical assistant: Job outlook

Rheumatology medical assistants are one of the fastest growing medical professions in the United States The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that employment of medical assistants will grow much faster than the average for all occupations between 2016 and 2026, at a rate of 29%.

The median annual wage for medical assistants was $32,480 in May 2017, according to the BLS. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $23,130, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $46,090.

Rheumatology medical assistants typically need a postsecondary certificate or diploma to enter the occupation. Some states have restrictions on what medical assistants can do, such as performing certain diagnostic tests or administering medications. Most states allow medical assistants to perform basic tasks under the supervision of a licensed health care provider.

Rheumatologists are physicians who specialize in diagnosing and treating patients with rheumatic diseases and conditions, which affect the joints, muscles and bones. A rheumatology medical assistant provides basic patient care and administrative support to rheumatologists. Rheumatology medical assistants typically have an associate degree or postsecondary certificate inmedical assisting. Some states require certification for certain tasks such as Laboratory procedures or other diagnostic tests.

Rheumatology medical assistant: Advancement opportunities

Rheumatology medical assistants are vital members of healthcare teams that diagnose and treat patients with rheumatologic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis, and gout. These conditions can cause joint swelling and pain, stiffness, deformities, and fatigue.

Rheumatology medical assistants typically have an associate degree or certification from a medical assistant program. Some states require medical assistants to be licensed or certified. Rheumatology medical assistants typically work in outpatient clinics and offices of rheumatologists—physicians who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases and conditions.

Advancement opportunities for medical assistants are limited. With experience, some medical assistants may become office managers or move into other administrative roles in healthcare settings. Some may choose to further their education by becoming a registered nurse or another type of healthcare provider.

Rheumatology medical assistant: Working conditions

Rheumatology medical assistants typically work in private rheumatology offices, clinics or hospitals. They may also travel to patients’ homes to provide care.

Rheumatology medical assistants typically work full time. They may work evenings or weekends to meet the needs of their patients.

Rheumatology medical assistant: FAQs

What is a rheumatology medical assistant?
A rheumatology medical assistant is a medical assistant who works in a rheumatology practice. Rheumatologists are doctors who treat patients with arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles, and bones.

What does a rheumatology medical assistant do?
The duties of a rheumatology medical assistant vary from office to office, but typically include taking patient histories and performing basic laboratory tests. Rheumatology medical assistants may also schedule appointments, bill insurance companies, and perform other administrative tasks.

How much does a rheumatology medical assistant make?
Rheumatology medical assistants typically earn between $30,000 and $40,000 per year. Salaries may be higher in larger practices or in areas with a high cost of living.

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