What Does an Orthopedic Medical Assistant Do?

An orthopedic medical assistant is a medical assistant who specializes in helping patients with injuries and diseases of the musculoskeletal system.

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What Does an Orthopedic Medical Assistant Do?

Orthopedic Medical assistants are an important part of the orthopedic surgeons’ team. They provide direct patient care before, during, and after surgery. They also work closely with the surgeon to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

Orthopedic Medical Assistants must be able to accurately take medical histories and vital signs, prepare patients for examination, assist with diagnostic tests and procedures, provide post-operative care, and educate patients on orthopedic conditions, treatments, and rehabilitation exercises. In addition, they may also be responsible for scheduling appointments, arranging for hospital admissions and testing, handling billing and insurance paperwork, and maintaining patient records.

The Role of an Orthopedic Medical Assistant

Orthopedic medical assistants are a vital part of the orthopedic team. They provide support to the physician in the examination and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

The duties of an orthopedic medical assistant include taking medical histories, performing physical examinations, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, assisting in surgery, providing patient education, and applying splints and casts. Orthopedic medical assistants may also be responsible for billing and coding.

Education requirements for orthopedic medical assistants vary by state. Some states require certification, while others do not. Certification is available through the National Healthcare Association and the American Medical Technologists.

The Duties of an Orthopedic Medical Assistant

Orthopedic medical assistants are specially trained to provide support to orthopedic surgeons and patients before, during, and after orthopedic surgeries and procedures. They typically work in outpatient clinics or offices, but may also be employed in hospitals. Orthopedic medical assistants are an important part of the orthopedic team, and their duties may include preparing patients for surgery, taking medical histories and vital signs, administering medications, performing diagnostic tests, assisting with surgeries and rehabilitation exercises, educating patients about post-operative care, and scheduling follow-up appointments.

The Education and Training of an Orthopedic Medical Assistant

Orthopedic medical assistants are vital members of the orthopedic team. They provide support to the orthopedic surgeon and other members of the team and care for patients with musculoskeletal conditions and disorders.

Orthopedic medical assistants must have a high school diploma or equivalent, and must complete a postsecondary medical assisting program that has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) or the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES).

Orthopedic medical assistants must be certified by passing the Certified Orthopedic Medical Assistant (COMA) exam administered by the American Association of Orthopaedic Technologists and Trainers (AAOTT).

The Salary and Job Outlook for an Orthopedic Medical Assistant

In order to practice as a medical assistant, one must have a high school diploma or equivalent, although many choose to complete a postsecondary education program. Medical assistants complete administrative and clinical tasks in the offices of physicians, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Their duties vary with the location, specialty, and size of the practice.

Orthopedic medical assistants work in the office of an orthopedist or other medical facility that treats patients with injuries or diseases of the bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and nerves. They may also work in outpatient clinics or nursing homes that treat orthopedic patients. The duties of an orthopedic medical assistant include greeting patients, scheduling appointments, answering phones, handling correspondence, verifying insurance benefits, coding and billing patients, completing forms, taking patient medical histories and vitals signs (height, weight, blood pressure), preparing patients for examination (draping them with a cloth so that only the area to be examined is exposed), helping the physician during the examination by handing him or her instruments and supplies and holding retractors when necessary during surgery. Orthopedic medical assistants may also be responsible for instructing patients on how to care for splints and other devices used after surgery; ordering supplies; maintaining equipment; taking X-rays; removing casts; preparing lab specimens for testing; and giving injections under the direction of a physician.

The Orthopedic Medical Assistant Certification

There is a voluntary Certification for Orthopedic Medical Assistants (COMA) through the National Board of Certification of Orthopedic Medical Assistants (NBCOMA). The COMA certification is granted to those who successfully complete both a written and practical examination. The practical examination consists of demonstrating five different orthopedic medical assistant skills in front of a COMA Board-Approved Proctor. The written examination consists of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

Anatomy and physiology
Orthopedic medical terminology
Patient positioning
Instrumentation
Examination and assessment
Documentation
casts, splints, and braces
Education and counseling
Clinical procedures
Basic X-ray analysis
Orthopedic diagnostic tests

The Orthopedic Medical Assistant Job Description

Orthopedic medical assistants are an important part of the orthopedic surgery team. They work closely with patients before, during, and after surgery to ensure a positive surgical experience.

The orthopedic medical assistant job description includes a wide range of duties. Pre-op duties may include taking medical histories and preparing patients for surgery. During surgery, the medical assistant will monitor the patient’s vital signs and provide support to the surgical team. Post-op duties may include instructions on post-operative care, wound care, and rehabilitation exercises.

The orthopedic medical assistant must be able to work well under pressure and have excellent communication skills. They must be able to understand and follow complex instructions. They must also be able to maintain a calm demeanor in order to provide support to both the surgical team and the patients.

The Orthopedic Medical Assistant Salary

As an orthopedic medical assistant, you will be responsible for providing support to patients with musculoskeletal disorders. This can involve assisting with office visits, scheduling appointments, and performing x-rays and other diagnostic tests. You will also be responsible for helping to prepare patients for surgery and providing postoperative care. In addition to these duties, you will also be responsible for maintaining medical records and billing insurance companies.

The average orthopedic medical assistant salary is $32,000 per year. However, salaries can range from $24,000 to $48,000 per year, depending on experience, location, and employer.

The Orthopedic Medical Assistant Career

The orthopedic medical assistant career is a field that is steadily growing along with the aging Baby Boomer population. An orthopedic medical assistant works with patients who have problems with their bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, or muscles. This can include conditions such as arthritis, fractures, and sprains. As the population continues to age, there will be an increasingly higher demand fororthopedic medical assistants.

The duties of an orthopedic medical assistant include taking patient histories, preparing patients for examination, Assist the physician during examination and treatment of patients, performing diagnostic tests such as X-rays and electrocardiograms (EKGs), scheduling appointments, and assisting in minor office surgery. They also provide patient education on orthopedic conditions and how to prevent further injury.

Orthopedic medical assistants must have excellent communication skills and bedside manner to work well with patients who are in pain. They must be able to handle both the physical demands of the job as well as the emotional demands of working with patients who are often dealing with chronic pain or disability.

There is no specific educational requirements to become an orthopedic medical assistant, but most employers prefer candidates who have at least a high school diploma or equivalent. Many orthopedic medical assistants have completed a postsecondary certificate or associate’s degree program in Orthopedic Assisting. These programs typically takes about 18 months to two years to complete and include coursework in anatomy, physiology, Medical Terminology diagnostic testing procedures, and office management.

The Orthopedic Medical Assistant Job Outlook

Orthopedic medical assistants are in high demand, and the job outlook for this career is very positive. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job growth for medical assistants is expected to be much faster than average, with 29% growth between 2019 and 2029.

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