What Does a Pulmonary Medical Assistant Do?

A pulmonary medical assistant is a medical assistant who specializes in the care of patients with pulmonary conditions.

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What Does a Pulmonary Medical Assistant Do?

Pulmonary Medical assistants are responsible for a variety of tasks related to the care of patients with pulmonary conditions. They may work in outpatient clinics, hospitals, or private practices, and their duties may include taking medical histories, recording vital signs, scheduling appointments, and assisting with diagnostic tests and procedures.

The Duties of a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

A pulmonary medical assistant is a health care professional who works with patients who have respiratory disorders. These disorders can include anything from asthma and emphysema to bronchitis and pneumonia. The duties of a pulmonary medical assistant vary depending on the specific job, but they typically include taking patient histories, performing physical exams, ordering and interpret diagnostic tests, administering medications and treatments, and educating patients about their condition.

The Education and Training of a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

While there is no formal education requirements to become a pulmonary medical assistant, most employers prefer candidates who have completed a postsecondary training program. These programs, which typically last one year or less, can be found at community colleges and technical schools. Some of the courses in these programs include Medical Terminology anatomy and physiology, patient relations and customer service, and basic office procedures.

The Certification of a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

The Certification of a Pulmonary Medical Assistant is granted by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). The NBRC is a not-for-profit agency that protects the public through certification and continuing education for pulmonary medical assistants and other respiratory therapists.

A certified pulmonary medical assistant is a health care professional who works under the supervision of a licensed physician or respiratory therapist to provide care for patients with respiratory disorders. These disorders can include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and others.

Pulmonary medical assistants usually work in outpatient settings, such as doctor’s offices, clinics, and hospitals. They may also work in Home Health Care settings or provide care in long-term care facilities, such as nursing homes In some states, they may be allowed to work in schools to provide care for children with asthma.

The duties of a pulmonary medical assistant include taking patient histories, performing physical exams, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, providing patient education, and assisting with treatments and therapies. They may also be responsible for scheduling appointments, maintaining medical records and billing insurance companies.

Most pulmonary medical assistants have at least an associate’s degree from an accredited program. Some states require certification from the NBRC, while others have their own certification requirements.

The Salary of a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

Pulmonary medical assistants play an important role in the care of patients with pulmonary disorders. These assistants work closely with pulmonologists, who are physicians specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases.

Pulmonary medical assistants typically have a bachelor’s degree in medical assisting or a related field. They must also complete a pulmonology training program approved by the National Board for Certification of Medical Assistants. Upon successful completion of the program, they are eligible to take the Certified Pulmonary Assistant examination.

Pulmonary medical assistants work in both outpatient and inpatient settings. In outpatient settings, they may work in clinics, hospitals, or private practices. Inpatient duties may include caring for patients who are hospitalized for pulmonary disorders. Duties of pulmonary medical assistants vary depending on the size and type of facility in which they work. However, there are some common duties that all pulmonary medical assistants perform. These duties include taking patient histories, measuring vital signs, performing respiratory therapy treatments, preparing patients for diagnostic testing, and assisting with Pulmonologist procedures.

The median annual salary for pulmonary medical assistants was $49,610 in May 2019, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The lowest 10 percent earned less than $33,870, while the highest 10 percent earned more than $69,700.

The Job Outlook for a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

The job outlook for a pulmonary medical assistant is very good. Many hospitals and clinics are looking for qualified individuals to fill this position. There are many job openings for this position, and the demand is expected to continue to grow in the future.

A pulmonary medical assistant is responsible for providing care to patients with respiratory conditions. They must be able to take vital signs, perform administrative duties, and educate patients on how to manage their condition.

If you are interested in becoming a pulmonary medical assistant, you will need to complete a certified medical assistant program. Once you have completed your training, you will be eligible to take the certification exam.

The Pros and Cons of Being a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

Like all medical professions, working as a pulmonary medical assistant has both its pros and cons. On the one hand, you get to help people who are suffering from a debilitating and often chronic respiratory condition. You get to be a part of their support network and help them manage their disease. On the other hand, you also have to deal with the emotional stress that comes with working with sick patients, as well as the administrative work that is required in any medical profession.

The “pros” of being a pulmonary medical assistant usually outweigh the “cons.” However, it is important to be aware of both sides of the coin before making a decision about whether or not this is the right career for you.

Some of the pros of being a pulmonary medical assistant include:
-You get to help people who are suffering from a serious disease.
-You get to work with other medical professionals in a team setting.
-You have the opportunity to specialize in one specific area of medicine.
-You have a good chance of getting a job after completing your training.
-You can make a good salary working as a pulmonary medical assistant.
Some of the cons of being a pulmonary medical assistant include:
-You have to deal with sick patients on a daily basis.
-You may have to work long hours, including nights and weekends.
-You have to deal with the emotional stress that comes with working with sick patients.
-The job can be physically demanding.

The Work Schedule of a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

Pulmonary medical assistants generally work full time. Some assistants may work part time, evenings, or weekends. Most work in doctors’ offices, hospitals, or clinics.

Pulmonary medical assistants typically have a regular workweek. However, because medical offices and clinics are often open on evenings and weekends, some assistants may work those hours. Also, when medical emergencies occur, pulmonary medical assistants may be asked to work additional hours.

The Work Environment of a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

Pulmonary medical assistants work in the offices of physicians who specialize in the treatment of pulmonary, or respiratory, disorders. They may also work in hospitals, outpatient care centers, and other healthcare facilities. Most pulmonary medical assistants work full time, and some may work evenings or weekends to accommodate the needs of their patients.

How to Become a Pulmonary Medical Assistant

Pulmonary medical assistants work in the medical field assisting pulmonary physicians with a variety of tasks. They may perform clinical tasks such as taking patient medical histories, measuring vital signs, and preparing patients for examination. They may also assist with administrative tasks such as scheduling appointments and handling medical billing

Becoming a pulmonary medical assistant requires completing an accredited postsecondary education program and passing a certification exam. Some states also require certification by the American Association of Medical Assistants or the National Healthcare Association.

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