CSI Offers Medical Assistant Program

Looking for a new career in the medical field? Check out our Medical Assistant Program at CSI! We offer a comprehensive curriculum that will prepare you for a successful career in the medical field!

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What is a medical assistant?

A medical assistant is a multi-skilled professional who supports the work of physicians and other health care providers. Medical assistants perform administrative and clinical tasks in ambulatory care settings such as physicians’ offices, group practices, and clinics. Their duties vary with the location, specialty, and size of the practice.

Duties of a medical assistant

Medical assistants are multi-skilled health professionals specifically trained to work in ambulatory settings such as physicians’ offices, group medical practices, and other outpatient facilities. The CSI Medical Assistant Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB).

Medical assistants perform many duties to support the work of physicians and other health professionals, as well as managing the front office. They take medical histories, measure vital signs (blood pressure, temperature, pulse rate, weight, and height), explain treatment procedures to patients, prepare them for examinations, assist with laboratory tests, perform routine office procedures, and schedule appointments. In addition they may also do billing and coding, work with insurance companies on reimbursement issues, manage medical records and file insurance claim forms.

Education and training for a medical assistant

Medical assistants are in high demand! Employers are looking for well-trained, detail-oriented individuals to join their team. If you have a passion for helping others and want to start a career in healthcare, the CSI Medical Assistant program may be a good fit for you!

The CSI Medical Assistant program is a comprehensive training program that will prepare you for a rewarding career in healthcare. The program includes both classroom instruction and hands-on training, so you’ll graduate with the skills and knowledge you need to be successful in your new career.

The medical assistant program at CSI

The medical assistant program at the College of Southern Idaho provides the skills and training necessary to perform both administrative and clinical tasks in a variety of medical settings. The program is designed to prepare students for employment as Medical Assistants in physician offices, hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities.

The program curriculum includes coursework in anatomy and physiology, Medical Terminology office procedures, insurance coding and billing, medical transcription and pharmacology. Clinical courses provide hands-on training in patient care procedures such as taking vital signs, administering injections, performing electrocardiograms (EKGs), and performing phlebotomy (drawing blood). Students also complete a externship in a medical office or clinic prior to graduation.

Why become a medical assistant?

Medical assistants play a vital role in the day-to-day operations of medical facilities. They work closely with patients, doctors, and other healthcare staff to ensure that the office runs smoothly. If you are detail-oriented, organized, and enjoy working with people, then a career as a medical assistant may be right for you.

There are many reasons to become a medical assistant. Here are just a few:

Job Security: The healthcare industry is growing rapidly, and medical assistants are in high demand. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of medical assistants will grow 23% from 2019 to 2029 — much faster than the average for all occupations.1

Good Pay: Medical assistants earn a median annual salary of $34,800.2 And, entry-level positions typically don’t require any formal education beyond a high school diploma or equivalent.

Flexible Scheduling: Many medical assisting positions offer flexible scheduling options that can work around your other commitments.

Help Others: Medical assistants play an important role in patient care. They often develop close relationships with patients and their families and take great pride in helping others.

The job market for medical assistants

The job market for medical assistants is expected to grow by 29% from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment of medical assistants is projected to grow because of the increasing number of aging baby boomers and their need for medical services. As the population continues to age, there will be an increasing demand for preventive medical services, which are often provided by medical assistants.

The future of medical assistants

The Certificate in Medical Assisting (CSI) offers a comprehensive education for those who want to enter the medical field. The coursework is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform the duties of a medical assistant.

The program is offered through the School of Health Sciences and includes classroom instruction, laboratory experiences, and an externship. Students who successfully complete the program will be prepared to take the Certified Medical Assistant Exam (CMAE) and earn their medical assistant certification.

Those who choose to pursue a career as a medical assistant will find that they are in high demand. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of medical assistants will grow 29 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations.1 With an aging population and an increasing focus on preventive care, medical assistants will be needed to perform routine tasks and procedures, such as taking vital signs and updating patient records.

Medical assistants are typically responsible for greeting patients, scheduling appointments, taking vital signs, updating patient records, answering phones, handling correspondence, preparing patients for examinations, assisting with procedures, and providing instructions to patients on post-operative care. Many medical assistants also have administrative duties such as handling billing and insurance claims. With the increasing use of electronic health records (EHRs), medical assistants must be comfortable using computers.

FAQs about medical assistants

Q: What is a medical assistant?
A: A medical assistant is an allied health professional who supports the work of physicians and other health professionals. Medical assistants are trained in a variety of tasks, such as taking medical histories, measuring vital signs, and drawing blood. In some states, medical assistants may also be certified to perform more advanced tasks, such as administering injections.

Q: What are the duties of a medical assistant?
A: The duties of a medical assistant vary depending on the state in which they practice. In general, medical assistants perform administrative tasks in doctor’s offices, clinics, and hospitals. They may also perform clinical tasks, such as taking patient vital signs and performing basic laboratory tests. In some states, medical assistants may also administer injections and other medications.

Q: How do I become a medical assistant?
A: Most medical assistants have at least a high school diploma or equivalent. Many programs also require completion of an accredited Medical Assistant program. Some states also require certification or registration for medical assistants.

10 things you didn’t know about medical assistants

1. Medical assistants are in high demand. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of medical assistants will grow by 29 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations.

2. Medical assistants perform both clinical and administrative tasks. They may take patients’ vital signs, such as blood pressure, temperature, and weight, and record this information in Medical records

3. Medical assistants also collect and prepare laboratory specimens, perform basic laboratory tests, sterilize medical instruments, and educate patients about their health conditions.

4. Many medical assistants have completed postsecondary education programs in medical assisting. These programs typically last 1 to 2 years and lead to a certificate or diploma. Some states require medical assistants to be licensed or certified.

5. Although not required, many medical assistants choose to become certified by passing an exam offered by the Certification Board of the American Association of Medical Assistants or a similar organization.

6. To maintain their certification, they must complete continuing education courses every few years.
7. Most medical assistant programs include courses in anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, transcription, insurance processing, and medications administration—such as how to safely administer injections and measure medications for dispensing—and computer literacy skills. Many programs also include an externship or clinical practicum in which students gain hands-on experience under the supervision of a licensed health care provider in a real-world setting such as a doctor’s office or clinic
8. In addition to demonstrating their clinical skills during an externship or clinical practicum, students in some programs may also be required to pass a competency exam administered by their state
9 After completing a formal education program, many medical assistants elect to become certified Upon passing the examination, they earn the credential Certified Medical Assistant (CMA). To maintain certification, CMAs must complete continuing education courses every few years

10Medical assistants work primarily in outpatient care centers, including physicians’ offices and clinics

5 myths about medical assistants

Working as a medical assistant is a great way to get started in the medical field. But there are some myths about the job that can make it seem less appealing than it really is. Here are five myths about medical assistants that you shouldn’t believe.

1. Medical assistants only do clerical work.

Medical assistants actually have a lot of responsibilities. They may take patients’ vital signs, prepare them for examination, give them injections, assist with minor procedures, and more.

2. Medical assistants only work in doctor’s offices.

Medical assistants can actually work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes and even research laboratories.

3. Medical assistants don’t need any training.

In most states, medical assistants must have at least a high school diploma or equivalent and complete an accredited training program before they can be certified to work in the field.

4. Medical assisting is a dead-end job.

Actually, medical assisting can be a great stepping stone to a career in nursing or other allied health professions. Many medical assistants go on to earn associate or bachelor’s degrees and become registered nurses, physical therapists, or other health care professionals.

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